The good, the bad and the darn right obscure

Anyone who reads these posts regularly will know I am somewhat obsessed with data on the book buying habits of Australians. My obsession is fuelled by the fact that American and British readers and writers get regular public feedback on varying kinds of genres (fiction, non-fiction, biography, romance, crime, sci-fi, etc) and more often than not, at least a smattering of sales data to go with it.

The good news – Books+Publishing has started printing Australia’s full weekly top 10 and fastest moving titles instead of just commenting on or two random titles. Their information comes from Nielsen and we now know that there data comes from 1,000 retailers nationwide.

The bad news – there are still no figures attached.

The darn right obscure – Publishers Weekly (PW) in the US has started publishing a weekly chart of the top ten bestsellers in Australia, New Zealand and the UK, also based on Nielsen data. Nielsen is, after all, a global company. But guess what? The two top ten lists do NOT match. There are only four books common to both lists and only one in the same position – Lady Midnight by Cassandra Clare at #2. The other common titles are The 8-Week Blood Sugar Diet (Michael Mosley); All the Light We Cannot See (Anthony Doerr); and The Road to Ruin (Niki Savva).Both lists also include fiction, non-fiction and children’s books. However,  a further difference is that the PW list gives a year-to-date sales figure.

You can compare the two lists here:Top Ten comparison

If you can make sense of the differences, or have any insights about how bestseller lists are compiled, we’d love to hear from you.

 

 

Advertisements
Leave a comment

4 Comments

  1. Great post Imelda! I’ll be checking out the Publishers’ Weekly site!

    Reply
  2. Thanks, Laura. Pretty weird that the two top ten lists don’t match!

    Reply
  3. Bronwyn Jameson

     /  May 21, 2016

    The PW list ranking matches YTD numbers ranking – maybe this isn’t a “this week’s sales” listing despite the heading indicating it is?

    Reply
    • That’s an interesting insight Bronwyn. Thanks. That certainly helps make sense of the differences. The Aus list is new for them so perhaps it still needs some fine-tuning.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

  • Subscribe by email

  • Subscribe by Feeder

  • Recent News

  • Blog Posts by Category

  • Archives

  • Our Team

    Blogmistress: Imelda Evans

    Blog Editor: Juanita Kees

    A Day in the Writing Life of... Keziah Hill

    Author Spotlights: Sarah Belle

    Cruisin' the Blogs: Juanita Kees

    New Releases: Laura Boon

    Blog Bites: Thea George

    Hearts Talk Wrap: Ainslie Paton

    Cover Contest: Eleni Konstantine

  • Your say:

    Otis on 2017 Ruby finalists
    S E Gilchrist on 2017 Ruby finalists
    annajacobsauthor on 2017 Ruby finalists
    Bernadette Rowley on 2017 Ruby finalists
    Edexcel GCSE Maths H… on BLOG BITE with Sandii Man…
  • RWAus Tweets

  • Pages

%d bloggers like this: