ROMA finalists!

I’m delighted to announce the finalists for the 2015/16 ROMA Award (below). The ROMA (Romance Media Award) began in 2006 to recognise outstanding reportage of romance. It is open to Australian print/broadcast/online media for coverage focusing on some aspect of romance publishing or writing (or reading as we discovered last year!) The contest is judged independently by a panel with communications, journalism and/or media experience and final scores averaged to determine the winner (thank you judges!).

In no particular order, those finalists are:

Huge thanks to those RWA members who nominated a piece in the ROMA this year, please do keep them coming (accepting entries for 2016/17 NOW!)—without you guys we might easily miss a true romance reportage gem.  If you have a piece in the coming year that you believe will be competitive, please do send me a link or a scanned copy at ROMA@romanceaustralia.com or hardcopies can be forwarded to RWA via ROMA Award | PO Box H120 | Hurlstone Park  NSW   2193

See you all next month!

Nikki Logan

ROMA Award Coordinator

From The Big Apple to Adelaide – and the RWA conference!

From New York to Adelaide

Some big names will head to South Australia for RWA’s annual conference in August, including Esi Sogah and Sarah Younger, coming all the way from the Big Apple. We interviewed the pair in the lead-up to our annual gathering.

Sogah RWAEsi Sogah, senior editor at Kensington Publishing

Have you been to Australia before? If not, what are you expecting?

I haven’t! I’ve wanted to go to Australia for years and years, so I’m incredibly excited (as is my father. He’s been giving me tips pretty much non-stop.) I’m definitely looking forward to exploring some of the cultural institutions. I love art, dance, and theatre, and I hear Adelaide is just bursting with culture. I’d also like to learn more about the history of Australia, so I guess all this means is I’ll be heading to a lot of museums. And if anyone has tips on avoiding the legendary insects I’ve heard about, please let me know!

What will you be doing at the conference?

I’ll be participating in panels as well as holding a workshop. The main thrust will be our changing roles in this new ‘digital age’ of publishing and how everything old is new again. I’m also looking forward to what are sure to be delightful parties. I love getting dressed up!

Will you be taking pitches? And tell us the kind of stories you’re currently looking for.

I will be taking pitches! I’m definitely looking for romantic suspense, as well as romantic mysteries (so, like suspense, but less violence, more fun). I’d also like to see more historical romance in ‘unusual’ settings, as we say. For general fiction, I really like ‘book club’ books—novels that tackle big issues in interesting ways and leave you thinking about your life in a new way.

Are there any romance fiction trends you’re predicting for 2016 and beyond?

I’m seeing a lot more romance with a lighter tone and I think we may see a return of the romantic comedy—though it might not be called that. But I think the pendulum is starting to swing away from the dark, angsty days of paranormal romance and New Adult. I think this is what drove the explosion of contemporary romance over the past few years, and as editors look for different types of stories within that genre, light-hearted plots and witty voices begin to break through.

Tell us about some of the projects and authors that have currently got you excited.

I’ve got so many that I love! One that I’m especially excited about is a series with [Aussie] Alli Sinclair. She’s already published two books in Australia, and the first one, Midnight Serenade, came out in the US in July. The series is three women’s fiction novels, each featuring a different kind of dance and a generational family story. It’s exactly the kind of fiction I love.

I’m also really excited about a series launching in April 2017 by Alyssa Cole. Set during the American Civil War, the first, An Extraordinary Union, tells the story of Elle, a freedwoman who goes back into slavery to serve as a spy for the Union, and the Scottish agent who becomes her partner in espionage and love. Each book in the series takes place during one year of the war and they’re just fantastically written while bringing to light stories that don’t often get told. As you can see, when it comes to my historical fiction, I love rich detail and big themes.

I’ve also got a really delightful erotica series, set at a kinky dude ranch! The first book, [Delphine Dryden’s] Ride ‘Em, is on sale now. So my list really runs the gamut:)

New York is the pinnacle of the publishing world. What’s it like to be a part of that scene? An average week?

Ooh, boy. It can get pretty crazy. I’m lucky to be at Kensington, where editors are really encouraged to spend their time editing manuscripts and reading submissions. But that doesn’t mean we don’t also have meetings with the art, marketing and sales departments; plenty of emails; copy to review; contracts to negotiate; and the myriad other things that go along with being an editor.

The strangest part of being based in NYC is that few authors are, so most editor/author relationships are digital or over the phone. I had an author I’d worked with for almost eight years before we met in person! So you have to get pretty good at understanding your writing tone, and I spend a lot of time making sure what I’m trying to communicate to my authors comes across. And, yes, we do get to have fun lunches with literary agents and attend fancy parties every once in a while, too.

What can you be found doing when you’re not working? We hear you’re partial to theatre!

It’s true. You’ll most likely find me in a theatre: Broadway, Off-Broadway, converted church, outdoors—I love it all. If not there, then honestly, I’m probably on my couch. Netflix gets quite the workout in my apartment! Also Acorn.tv. Basically, if it’s a mystery, British, or historical—or even better, all three—I’m watching.

Sarah E. Younger, agent at Nancy Yost Literary Agency

Hello, have you ever been to Oz before?

Sarah YoungerI have not been to Australia before and I’m thrilled to be headed down later this year. I’m expecting lots of friendly faces and great conversations. (Along with some fabulous wine!) I’m also looking forward to checking out traditional tourist-y sights, because why not?

What will you be doing at this year’s conference?

I expect that I will be quite busy! But the mini list that I can rattle off the top of my head includes, of course, meeting with my clients, and with some of Nancy’s/NYLA’s local clients, taking pitches, doing a workshop, and participating in a panel. And if that doesn’t fill up my time, whatever Amy Matthews and Linda Brown (the organisers who I met at our Romance Writers of America national conference last year in NYC), ask of me…as long as I get to sleep at some point.

Will you be taking pitches? And tell us the kinds of stories you’re looking for right now.

Yes, I will be taking pitches. I quite enjoy taking pitches because you never know what exciting new project will come along. I’m looking for all kinds of romance projects. I’m not sure what’s at the top of my romance wish list at the moment, so I hate to say ‘I’ll know it when I find it’, but again I’m open to all varieties.

I’m also looking to add more women’s fiction to my list, in particular cross-generational stories that highlight relationships between grandparents and their grandchildren. I think that there is something special about that bond, and would love to read something that makes me laugh…and cry. But to find out even more about my tastes and what I represent, feel free to check out my page on our agency’s website, http://www.nyliterary.com.

Are there any romance fiction trends you’re predicting for the future?

This is a hard one, but I think that for a while some were saying historicals were down. I have always loved historicals—in fact, they were my first romance love and they got me my job with NYLA—but I think that they are, and will be, making a resurgence of sorts in the next few years. Also, I think that there is going to be a shift away from straight-up contemporaries to contemporary with something else to hook readers, so the subgenres are going to come into play. And then, I think, and hope, that the diverse aspects that colour our own lives will make themselves even more present in the fiction works we read.

Please tell us about some of the projects and authors you’re most excited about currently.

This might be the hardest question you’ve asked and it’s not because I’m lacking in excitement. It’s because I have too many options, and to be quite frank, I’m a little superstitious and I don’t want to jinx any projects that I’m getting ready to go out on submission with. However, I will say that I’m very excited to be working with my ladies from Australia and New Zealand, Ms Bronwen Evans, Ms Angela Bissell and Ms Bronwyn Stuart (all of whom I’m hoping to see when I head down later this year). And if that doesn’t satiate your curiosity on what I’m excited about, feel free to check out my Twitter feed @seyitsme.

What’s it like being part of the New York literary scene?

I hate to pull back the curtain on Oz with this answer, but I find my week to be consumed with emails from authors and editors, the sorting royalty statements and reviewing contracts, and in general, working out ways to solve any problems that arose over the previous week/weekend. We all work long hours, and most of us are doing it because it’s an industry that we’re passionate about.

However, I will say that yes, we do have exciting moments when a book launches or hits a list. And you really can’t quite compare the feeling one gets when I get to call a debut author to tell them that a publisher has offered on their work. And the work lunches are usually quite fun and enlightening, though I will say those lunches do not happen every day. But, all in all, it’s really not how they depict it in the movies, or even on cable TV—at least as far my experience goes. There are no cigars and very rarely does one find themselves with a tumbler half-full of whiskey or other strong spirits.

What can you be found doing when you’re not working?

Well, I grew up on a horse farm, so once upon a time my answer would have been out riding or at least in the barn. But now that I’m in the city, if I’m not working and/or work-reading, I’m usually enjoying a stroll through Central Park, walking my way down the halls of museums that are becoming more and more familiar, going to movies or concerts, reading for pleasure, and last but not least, enjoying a nice meal with friends and family.

If you haven’t booked for the conference but would like to, there’s still time, but it’s running out fast.  Hie thee to the RWA Website and book now!

Conference dithers? We have a Maggie for that!

Heading to Your First RWA Conference? Meet Maggie!

RWA’s 25th anniversary conference, themed Ain’t Love Grand, is being held in Adelaide from 19 – 21 August – and SA contemporary and paranormal romance author Maggie Mundy is in charge of showing the ropes to all the conference ‘newbies’. We chatted to her.

Maggie Mundy Maggie, tell us about yourself as a writer and your role helping newbies. I came to writing later in life after doing a degree in drama and creative writing. I found joining RWA was one of the best moves I made in my journey to publication. I write paranormal romance and have been published by Soul Mate Publishing in the US.

My role will be to help the newbies before conference with any questions they have. I will be available on the weekend of the conference as well. Many writers chat on the Facebook group leading up to conference, so this means they’ll already know each other come conference time.

How can newbies connect up pre-conference? We have a closed, newbies-only Facebook group, where you can sign up to meet new people, develop pre-conference friendships, and ask heaps of questions in a safe, private environment. If you have not received an invite, then contact me on maggiemundy@bigpond.com.

scarredPROTECTOR_805x1275 (2)Are there any newbie events held at the actual conference? We will be having a get-together for a pre-cocktail chat with the president, Leisl Leighton, who’ll take the opportunity to welcome people to their first romance conference. I’m sure it will not be their last! I will give details of the time and place nearer to the conference.

In the past, what have been the experiences of newbies getting together? Many of the newbies from last year, when I also helped out, have kept in contact through Facebook. And I am sure many of them will be catching up with each other again this year!

Being a conference ‘virgin’ can feel a little daunting. Your top tips?

  • Wear layered clothing. The venue is climate-controlled but we all have different temperature thresholds.
  • Be polite and be engaged. When someone takes an interest and opens a conversation, share the talking.
  • RWA members are a friendly lot and most of the time they’ll be happy to chat. But if they don’t engage with you, don’t take it personally—it may be they’re talking to their editor about their book, or they’ve just caught up with a friend they haven’t seen in 12 months and in their excitement to see each other, they accidentally leave you out. Just smile and move on to the next person/conversation.
  • Drink lots of water.
  • If you’re pitching, be professional. Do your homework on the agent/editor you’re pitching to, dress appropriately, have your pitch polished to a gleam, and be on time.

I’m so looking forward to meeting everyone in person at the conference. See you in August!

To book for RWA’s annual conference—which is all set to razzle-dazzle in marking 25 years—or for more information, visit http://www.romanceaustralia.com/p/229/Adelaide-16.

RITA winners announced

Ahead of the announcement of the Romance Writers of Australia’s RUBY and Emerald award winners at our 2016 conference in Adelaide, we share the winners of RWAmerica’s RITA and Golden Heart winners. The RITA and Golden Heart awards are for published books and unpublished manuscripts respectively. It is interesting to note that when publishing the shortlist, RWAmerica pays tribute to authors, publishers and editors.

The 2016 winners are:

RITA AWARDS

  • Romance Novella Nice Girls Don’t Ride by Roni Loren
  • Contemporary Romance: Long Brokedown Cowboy by Maisey Yates
  • Young Adult Romance The Anatomical Shape of a Heart by Jenn Bennett
  • Historical Romance: Long Tiffany Girl by Deeanne Gist
  • Romantic Suspense Flash Fire by Dana Marton
  • Paranormal Romance Must Love Chainmail by Angela Quarles
  • Erotic Romance For Real: A Spires Story by Alexis Hall
  • Historical Romance: Short It Started with a Scandal by Julie Anne Long
  • Inspirational Romance A Noble Masquerade by Kristi Ann Hunter
  • Contemporary Romance: Short The Nanny Plan by Sarah M. Anderson
  • Contemporary Romance: Mid-Length Him by Sarina Bowen and Elle Kennedy
  • Best First Book Forget Tomorrow by Pintip Dunn

RITA winnersGOLDEN HEART AWARDS

  • Contemporary Romance Shelter Me by Gabrielle Luthy
  • Young Adult Romance The Beekeeper by Meg Kassel
  • Historical Romance The Earl and the Pussycat by Elizabeth King
  • Romantic Suspense In the Wrong Sights by Tracy Brody
  • Paranormal Romance Don’t Call Me Cupcake by Tara Sheets
  • Inspirational Romance For the Love of Termites by Kimberly MacCarron
  • Short Contemporary Romance Rescuing Riley by Carrie Nichols

For further information and links to the books and authors go to the announcement on the RWAmerica website page.

Valerie Parv Award Finalists

Congratulations to our 2016 Valerie Parv Award finalists:

Raewyn Bright

Samara Kelly

Jess Langhorne

Jodie Morphett

Chris Weston

Samantha Wicks

Well done to all who entered, especially to Aspiring members for whom this might be their very first contest. We hope your judging feedback is useful in improving and revising your manuscript!

The finalist entries will be read and evaluated by bestselling author and writing coach Valerie Parv AM.

Thanks to all our volunteer judges, and the contest manager, Jo McAlister.

July New Member Releases

Brrrrrr! Cold winds are sweeping all across the Eastern states. Lucky you, if you live further North and your feet aren’t icicles. Definitely time to stay indoors, tucked under a doona and read a stack of romance novels.

HTJul16-New Releases

A Writer’s Life: Ditching Perfection

Today we are starting a new feature on the RWA blog, where we interview our members about their writing lives.   Today’s guest is Anna Hackett.  This column first appeared in this month’s Hearts Talk, the RWA newsletter.  So if you are a member, don’t forget to read it.  And if you aren’t, you might want to join, now that you’ve seen what you’re missing out on!

Anna-Hackett2-208x300When I started writing this article, I tried to think about the things I’d like to go back and tell my younger writer self. Little pearls of wisdom I wish I’d known when I first started writing. The list got a little long…and many of those things I think I just needed to experience and grow through as part of my journey as a writer.

But one thing stood out.

There is one thing that made a big difference in my writing career and it is the one thing I wish I could have realized sooner.

That thing: ditching the pursuit of perfection.

Now, many of us are conditioned to think we need to achieve perfection in our lives (especially women!) We think we need the perfect house, kept in the perfect condition, with our perfectly behaved kids, our loving, perfect marriage, our perfect, successful career and we have to look perfect while we’re doing all of that! We feel the need to be superwoman and have it all.

There’s a quote by Salvador Dali — Have no fear of perfection. You’ll never reach it. He’s right. Deep down, we all know it.

As writers, we can fall into the trap of needing our writing to be “perfect.” It’s easy to do. When that story idea bursts inside our head, it seems flawless. It’s exciting, thrilling, gut-wrenching. It’s the best story idea ever! Then once we start putting the words to the blank page…well, the story never seems to come out as perfectly as what we had in our head. That’s when the pursuit of perfection becomes harmful. The doubts, the dreaded inner editor, all start whispering (or shouting) at us and suddenly we’re avoiding doing the writing, we’re agonizing over it, we’re procrastinating.

If we do manage to get the draft done, then that pursuit of perfection can have us endlessly editing and polishing—over and over—and we’re never quite finished. But it doesn’t stop there. The elusive pursuit of perfect can mean we never let our story out into the world. We worry it isn’t good enough, that we’ll receive criticism, rejections from agents and publishers, bad reviews from readers and reviewers, no sales. It can paralyze us from doing that thing we’re supposed to do—tell and share the stories inside us.

I don’t remember when I finally decided to give perfection a boot to the face, but it was the best thing I ever did. Suddenly, I was focused on just getting words out—any words, they didn’t have to be perfect or even good ones. Then I focused on editing until the story was done (not perfect!) Then I sent those stories out there as they were, for better or worse.

I’m not saying we shouldn’t keep learning, honing our craft, and improving. We should also always listen to trusted, constructive criticism that helps us become better writers. But if you keep waiting for your stories to be perfect, you’re letting good, great, wonderful, and pretty darn awesome stories get away.

If you’re waiting until your story is so amazing, so perfect that everyone will love it, no one will criticize it, and it’ll never get a bad comment…you’ll never begin, let alone finish.

So, don’t let your good, great and amazing pass you by.

Ditch perfection and begin.

– Anna Hackett [http://annahackettbooks.com]

Western Australian writer Anna Hackett is a mining engineer, a mother of two young sons, and a USA Today bestseller. She writes fast-paced action/adventure/sci-fi/romance. She’s published with Harlequin and Carina Press and now she’s self-publishing and writing up a storm.

 

Anne Gracie’s A Writer’s Life is a regular column featured in Romance Writers of Australia’s monthly journal, Hearts Talk. Packed full of articles on craft, the publishing industry and interviews with romance authors, Hearts Talk is a valued and much-loved benefit to your RWA membership. If you’re not already an RWA member, join up here [http://www.romanceaustralia.com/p/99/Join-RWA].

Ruby Finalists!

Every year at RWA, we invite romance writers with books published in the previous year to enter the Ruby – RWA’s Romantic Book of the Year contest.   The final results are announced at the Gala Dinner at our annual conference in August (which is in Adelaide this year).  But for now, just to whet your appetite, we are delighted to announce the finalists in the five categories.  We are also delighted to point out that this year, we have included the novella category in its rightful place, in the Ruby list.

Today, to spread the love as quickly as possible, we’re just publishing the list, but over the next week, we’ll devote a day to each of the categories and share the covers and more information about these wonderful finalists – so watch this space for additions to your TBR list!

Long Romance

  • Rise by Karina Bliss – self-published
  • The Spring Bride by Anne Gracie – Berkley/Penguin Random House
  • Kakadu Sunset by Annie Seaton – Pan Macmillan Australia
  • Lethal in Love by Michelle Somers – Random House Australia

Romantic Elements

  • A Dangerous Arrangement by Lee Christine – Escape Publishing
  • The Patterson Girls by Rachael Johns – Harlequin MIRA
  • Pay The Piper by Mary Brock Jones – self-published
  • Between the Vines by Tricia Stringer – Harlequin MIRA

Short Sexy

  • Tribal Law by Shannon Curtis – Australian Romance Readers Association
  • The Wedding Bargain by Yvonne Lindsay – Harlequin Desire
  • Pretend It’s Love by Stefanie London – Entangled Lovestruck
  • Never Surrender by Rosie Miles – Entangled Ignite
  • Seducing His Enemy’s Daughter by Annie West – HM&B Sexy

Short Sweet

  • You For Christmas by Madeline Ash – Tule Publishing
  • Still Married To Her Ex! by Lucy Clark – HM&B Medical
  • Home to Bindarra Creek by Juanita Kees – self-published
  • The Secret Son by Joan Kilby – Tule Publishing
  • Reach For The Stars by Kerrie Paterson – self-published

Novella

  • Mistletoe Maverick by Shannon Curtis – self-published
  • Silk & Scars by Cassandra Dean – Decadent Publishing
  • Pursued By The Rogue by Kelly Hunter – Tule Publishing
  • What A Bachelor Needs by Kelly Hunter – Tule Publishing

The importance of backlist sales

More analysis of the May 2016 Author Earnings Report

The AuthorEarnings (AE) May 2016 report studied one million titles. That covered 294,091 authors, broken down as follows:

  • 123,371:  Small/Medium Publisher Authors
  • 75,943: Indie Authors
  • 35,457: Big Five Authors
  •  1,822: Amazon Imprint Authors, and
  • 57,498: Uncategorised (either single title authors or those that AE could not categorise as one of the above)

One of the subsets of the report looked at how much of a boost non-listed titles add to a bestselling author’s bottom line. This is an interesting question. Essentially, it is a look at backlist sales and how much they add to an author’s bottom line.

According to AuthorEarnings, the answer varies by publisher type. Indie authors and Big Five authors with one or more bestseller listed titles benefit the most, gaining an additional 30% and 21% respectively in sales. Authors with small to medium publishing houses get an additional contribution of 13%.

The AE report doesn’t comment on when these backlist sales are highest, but I would think that authors get the biggest boost to backlist sales at launch or shortly afterwards when you are top-of-mind with the reader in question. Promotions of backlist titles within two to six months after launch of a new book could be very beneficial. Of course, this is all based on the premise that your new book was a ‘bestseller’ and made enough of an impression for readers to remember you favourably.

Here’s a graph* reflecting the boost backlist sales give an author by publishing category.

Blog graph

The data for Amazon-Imprint Published authors with listed bestsellers is of an anomoly. Their other non-listed titles only contribute an additional 5% to their bottom lines. AE speculate that this

  • Either reflects the small number of both authors and titles that Amazon Imprints publish,
  • Or that superior Amazon marketing strategies and solutions keeps a higher percentage of these authors titles visible on the bestseller lists in the first place.

AE also pulled related Amazon data on 900,000 top-selling print titles and 67,000 top selling audiobooks, including every format of every single title by any author who had even one title of any format on any Amazon bestseller list. This made it the most comprehensive AE report ever.

They say that their report is very representative of the US market, and that, in fact, in the American market, Amazon accounts for 50% of the sales of all traditionally published authors and 85% of all indie authors.

However, I have some quibbles:

  1. The AE report authors do not say how they know that 50% of the sale of all traditionally published authors and 85% of the sales all indie authors go through Amazon. I would like to know where that information comes from, especially on traditionally published authors. Most publishing houses are not listed companies and like most private companies, they are notoriously shy about giving away information. I have asked them the question and will let you know when I get an answer.
  2. They acknowledge that their study does not include the non-Amazon.com sales: print sales through brick and mortar bookstores and other mass merchandisers; ebook sales through Apple iBookStore, barnesandnoble.com, Kobo, and Google Play; audiobook sales through iTunes; print books sold online through non-Amazon.com retailers; library sales; publisher-direct sales; author-direct sales; non-US digital and online print sales through other Amazon stores such asAmazon.co.uk, Amazon.ca, Amazon.au, etc.; and other foreign sales.
  3. They are not overly fussed about sales in other markets as they say most US authors earn the majority of their income in America. However, that applies equally for Australian authors; most Australian authors will make the bulk of their sales in Australia so if you are not an American author, you have to be aware that other factors may be different in your market, including the percentage contribution of other retailers and outlets.

I’ll keep looking at the results from the Author Earnings May 2016 over the next few weeks. In the meantime, if you would like to read the full report, you will find it here. You can also sign up to receive their reports of follow them on Twitter: @AuthorEarnings

Note: Graphs provided by AuthorEarnings.

Covers that we love!

As writers, we pour our hearts into choosing just the right words to tell our stories – but to put a finished book into the reader’s hands, we need to rely on others’ skills.  Chief among these others is the cover designer.  A good cover can entice a reader and add to the pleasure of the story – and the best ones thrill authors!  Each year, to celebrate the blessings of the cover fairies, our published members submit their favourite recent covers for fellow members to choose the ones they like most.

The contest is over for another year, so without further ado, here are our favourite covers for this year, as judged by our members in the following categories:

Contemporary Romance:

  • Title: Operation White Christmas
  • Author: Nicki Edwards
  • Cover Design: Unknown Artist

Operation White Christmas-Nicki Edwards

 

Erotic/Sexy Romance

  • Title: The Veiled Heart
  • Author: Elsa Holland
  • Cover Design: Hang Le

The Veiled Heart-Elsa Holland

 

Historical Romance

  • Title: The King’s Man
  • Author: Alison Stuart
  • Cover Design: Escape Publishing

The King's Man Alison Stuart

 

New Adult/Young Adult Romance

  • Title: The Finn Factor
  • Author: Rachel Bailey
  • Cover Design: Unknown Artist

The Finn Factor-Rachel Bailey

 

Paranormal Romance (includes Fantasy and Sci-fi)

  • Title: The Shattered Court
  • Author: M.J. Scott
  • Cover Design: Unknown Artist

The Shattered Court-M.J. Scott

 

Romantic Elements

  • Title: Pretty Famous
  • Author: Carla Caruso
  • Cover Design: Unknown Artist

Pretty Famous-Carla Caruso

 

Romantic Suspense

  • Title: Storm Clouds
  • Author: Bronwyn Parry
  • Cover Design: Hannah Janzen

Storm Clouds-Bronwyn Parry

 

Rural Romance

  • Title: Summer and the Groomsman
  • Author: Cathryn Hein
  • Cover Design: Kellie Dennis, Book Cover by Design

Summer and the Groomsman-Cathryn Hein

Thanks to everyone who entered and judged, to our co-ordinator and back-of-house organisers (Claire and Kerrie particularly) and to the cover fairies!

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